I have talked at length on the topic of how top executives can utilize LinkedIn as a tool in their career toolbox in my articles, Tips VPs to CXOs MUST KNOW to Leverage the Power of LinkedIn Part 1 and Part 2.

Now I would like to share some tips on content with you.

If you are a Director, VP, EVP, COO, CEO, CFO, CMO, CSO, CIO, CTO, CISO, CRO (my fingers are getting tired, so my apologies to all the other CXOs out there), or Board-Level Executive, these tips are for you.

Your Name

I know this is about content, but in order to explain rationale, I have to share that you need to optimize for findability. One of the ways you can do this is with your name. After your name, you can add a certification or an MBA. Recruiters and other key decision makers search by advanced degrees and special certificates, so this is a great and easy way to increase your chances of coming up in keyword search results.

Your Headline

This is my favorite because it is where you get the most optimization juice. For what unique quality do you want to be found? For being part of an MNC or Fortune 100 company? Maybe for the industry you are in? How about utilizing keywords that center around a specialty of yours; say, Cloud Technology Mergers & Acquisitions? Think about your unique value proposition. Think about what you want to do next, if you could do anything—then work backwards. Your keywords should mirror your goals (the ones that match, at least!). You can separate your keywords with a comma or a pipe (, or |).

Your Summary

If you want to make it easy for someone to contact you directly after they have glanced at your profile, you can elect to put your contact information FIRST in your summary. Again, this is so that if a recruiter is using the LinkedIn Recruiter app, they will be able to easily find and clearly see your contact information, even if they cannot see your entire profile. You can format your contact information like this:

E-mail: myemail.com | Phone: 000.000.0000

If you haven’t heard by now, less is more. So concentrate on the one thing you know will grab someone’s attention. Start with your unique value proposition and the results you achieve. Sometimes you can use exact metrics, but if you don’t feel comfortable giving away exact figures, why not use approximate ones or quantify accomplishments using percentages? You could say, “Drove top-line revenue 350% over previous years in 12 months.” Short, sweet, and very effective.

Most writers and marketers agree that first-person informal is the tense and style with which to craft your LinkedIn profile.

Your Professional Experience

Starting with a little information about the general size and specialty of the company. Again, the style is rooted in brevity. One or two single-sentence accomplishments should set the tone and pace for a positive cursory glance. You are trying to hit major points and create intrigue. You do not want your profile to look or read like your executive resume.