Category: Executive Branding (page 1 of 2)

Mary Elizabeth Bradford in Forbes: How to Maintain Your Executive Brand During COVID-19

I’m honored to be featured in the latest Forbes article on ways executives can demonstrate empathy and remain on brand in “16 Tips For Keeping Your Brand’s Tone Appropriate During A Crisis.”


Mary Elizabeth Bradford is a member of the Forbes Coaches Council. You can read all of her articles as Forbes Contributor by visiting Mary Elizabeth Bradford, CERM, CMRW, CARW, MCD, Forbes Coaches Council Member.

Future CEOs: You’ll Need Integrity, Agility, and Creativity

Read about the current expectations of future CEOs in Chief Executive’s article, “The CEOs Of The Future Aren’t Who You Think.” Ed Cody, Chairman of the Pentagon Federal Credit Union, outlines the “characteristics of leaders that ultimately lead to solid organizational culture and success” in the areas of people, leaders and business.

CEOs & Branding: How is Your Emotional Connectivity?

CEOs & Branding: How is Your Emotional Connectivity?Customers value authenticity more than ever. Executives must now connect emotionally on social media, echoing their company’s values and purpose, in order to generate trust and loyalty.

Raoul Davis, Partner at Ascendant Group, a global CEO and corporate branding firm, shares three great tips for CEOs to improve their branding in the Forbes article, “Executive Branding: The Importance Of Communicating Values To Increase Emotional Connectivity.”

Expanded Uses for Executive Resumes

Today's Executive Resume Is No Longer Just For Job Searching

A big thanks to Forbes for publishing my article, Today’s Executive Resume Is No Longer Just For Job Searching, which highlights five ways executives may not have considered utilizing their resume to advance their career.

Top 10 Executive Resume Writing Tips for 2019

Top 10 Executive Resume Writing Tips for 2019 If you’re an executive looking for trending advice on how to update your resume for maximum result, follow my executive resume writing tips below!

We give complimentary consultations. If you wish to schedule a time for us to chat about your next move, contact us by clicking on the ‘work with us’ link at the bottom right of our website.

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Executive Leadership: 9 Key Characteristics of Trusted Industry Leaders

This is a MUST READ for all C-level leaders. It resonated with me deeply, because I learned a long time ago that the foundation of all interviews is the opportunity to engender trust in a small window of time. Read the full article, “Why Jonathan Thurston is One of the Most Trusted Leaders,” by personal branding coach, Jane Anderson.

Protecting Your Online Image

Online_Resources_image

Good information on protecting your online image:

  Read about it here!

The Executive Bio – A Career Management Essential

A  very interesting and short article on The Executive Biography from BlueSteps. They have a fresh idea: use your bio when networking. I like that idea a lot!

A couple additioexecutive-biography-article-minnal tips:

  • Who else expects to see your biography? Boards and Senior Groups in PE/VC Firms.
  • Please never, ever, ever use an amateur photo in your bio or LI profile. A professional photo with good lighting is the quality level you must stick to. Please, trust me on this one. You deserve to look fantastic and your attention to professional polish will keep your confidence intact!

Read more here:  BlueSteps

Tips on How CxOs Can Optimize Their Executive LinkedIn Profiles

Many C-level executives tell me they have a LinkedIn profile but don’t really do anything with it. Other CxOs share they don’t even have a profile. Concerns range from simple lack of time or interest to privacy concerns.

I think the main issue is lack of understanding relative to value. Many executives simply don’t see how LinkedIn can benefit them. But there IS value in having a LinkedIn profile if you are a top executive. Below are several ideas and tips for leveraging those benefits:

Adjust Your Privacy & Settings

First, if you are concerned about privacy, in the security settings of your profile, you can change the setting for “Select who can see your connections” to “Only you.”

This way, your company and your competition cannot see who you are connected to. And if you wish to connect with others that may raise an eyebrow or two within your team (top-retained recruiters—or even your competition), no one can view your connections except for you.

Summary Statement

It’s a good idea to have an email—and maybe even a phone number—at the very beginning of the Summary statement. This ensures that people who may be visiting your profile can reach out to you, even if they may be outside of your first- or second-degree network of connections. If you are open to new opportunities, there is no reason to broadcast it, since you can very easily give someone a way to reach out to you!

Privacy tip: set up a new Gmail account with a variation of your name or something that is business-friendly, and use that email in your LinkedIn Summary statement.

Keyword Headings

When deciding on your keyword headings, think about what a recruiter or other key decision maker might be looking for when searching for someone like you. An advanced degree, splashy award, high-level certification, or size/scope information, such as “Fortune 500 Companies,” “Fast Growth Start-Ups,” Board Member,” or “International Expansions.” If you are looking to change industries, think of how broad your industry choice can be without looking as if you are searching for another opportunity.

Depth & Breadth

Most resume writers agree that LinkedIn profiles are best written in first-person informal. Generally speaking, the details in your profile should not be covered as thoroughly as they are in your executive resume. A good rule of thumb is to add just enough detail to create intrigue. Your profile should never, in my professional opinion, broadcast that you are looking for another opportunity. LinkedIn seems to work best for establishing thought leadership and to expand your network into specific areas.

Expand Your Network

When you expand your network with recruiters and key decision makers across a few industries and divisions, you are creating a network that can be leveraged. For example, a few years ago my husband was complaining that his LinkedIn connections were almost nonexistent. He is in the wine business, so I suggested he find those in “his tribe” through direct searches and LinkedIn groups and invite them into his network. Within 45 days my husband had more than 400 of the most powerful global connections of suppliers, distributors, wineries, vintners, wine-recruiters, HR directors, and high-profile critics in the wine industry. He regularly receives important information and job solicitations now through his LinkedIn profile.

Thought Leadership

Have your read an insightful industry article in Forbes that you agree with? Did you recently attend—or even better—speak at an industry conference? Attend or help lead a community event? Why not share that in your activity broadcast? Articles are another great way to share your insight; including pictures or videos will make them more clickable. Remember to keep it all business! This is an excellent way to solidify your brand and thought leadership within your network.

Although there are many other optimization and design tips that are important to know, these tips are great starting points to get you using LinkedIn as a tool that will give you market leverage and solidify your branding message.

Selected as a Top Career Website

Excited to announce we have been selected as a Top Career Website on Career Igniter!

http://www.careerigniter.com/career-websites/

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