Tag: CMO Resumes

The Executive CMO Resume that Landed 15 Potential Job Interviews in 2 Weeks

The majority of our executive resume clients share that they are able to end their job searches soon after we create their executive resumes. Why? Well, there are three rules we always apply that benefit every one of our CXO clients:

  • The second rule is that we create visually stimulating and well-organized executive resumes that are easy to digest and provide fundamental context (scale, scope, and alignment) at the cursory glance.
  • And third, we frontload and highlight the metric-driven results you achieve vs. what you do (a weaker position). This clearly establishes your leadership in the minds of your reader.

In the example below, we applied these three principals for this Chief Marketing Officer of Fortune 500 Companies. We then added some rocket fuel to her existing search strategies by conducting an executive recruiter distribution for her, while introducing her to executive recruiters in her area of expertise.

CMO Executive Resume Sample

Click to view full resume.

View the full CMO executive resume sample here.

Recently this client wrote us to apprise us of her progress. In her email, she states she landed 15 solid recruiter conversations and interviews for potential opportunities. She added that she felt the branding and packaging were incredibly well-received.

I confess — marketing executives are our TOUGHEST clients because after all — we both do the same things! This makes me especially proud and pleased for this outstanding Fortune 500 executive. This serves as a good benchmark for the kinds of results that can be fluidly achieved for C-Level executives if they have these following things in place: a clear focus of direction, expertly written and designed marketing collateral, and 2 or 3 C-level job search strategies. If you want to explore these strategies, I outlined a few of them here.

LinkedIn for Executives: Tips VPs to CXOs MUST KNOW to Leverage the Power of LinkedIn – Part 2

linkedinPART 2: IMPLEMENTATION

In Part 1 of this article (which I strongly recommend you read if you haven’t already) I shared that your primary objective for utilizing LinkedIn is threefold:

  • Connect with key players.
  • Keyword optimize your profile so that when people find you and want to pitch job opportunities your way, you will have already aligned your profile with the opportunities that are most relevant to your talents, skills, and preferences—and crucial to your happiness and job satisfaction.
  • Use LinkedIn to develop thought leadership.

Let’s break down how these top three steps can be achieved:

Join Groups in Order to Connect with Key Players

There are tens of thousands of groups and group forums on LinkedIn. Forums give you an instant audience in a particular industry, networking group, alumni group, recruiter group, company, or geographic area! Currently, you can join up to 50 groups.

Search for groups on LinkedIn using the search bar at the top of your profile, and pick those groups that are most relevant to you. If you are a CFO in the airline industry, you might use keywords including CFO, Airline Executives, Financial+Aviation, etc…

Once you are accepted into a group, you can pose a question, post a news or blog article, or check out new career opportunities in the jobs section of the group.

But your most important priority, once you have joined LI groups, is to scroll through the member listing and invite key players and recruiters to join your network! Your reason for doing so? Because you are both members of the same group!

Why do this? Because you need to be in someone’s first-, second-, or third-degree network if you’re going to show up in their search results when they are looking for someone like you! In just minutes a week, you can check out the member listings for your groups and email select members to quickly and strategically grow your network.

To do so, check their profile for an email, then click the connect button and choose the “Other” option. Your message to whomever you wish to invite is simple: We’re in XYZ group together and I want to invite you to join my network! No need to include a greeting, since LinkedIn does that for you.

In the event that you can’t find an email, you can also directly message that person and ask them to connect with you or ask a fellow group member to introduce you. A third way (and the way I do it) is to check off the “Colleague” button so you can send them an invite directly.

Some will say you must know the person to use the “Colleague” option (including LinkedIn); however, I am of the school of thought that if you and I share a group together and I want to invite you to join my network, the fact that LinkedIn forces me to say you are a colleague in order for me to send you an invite is more of an “oh well, okay” situation. But that is me and just my personal opinion. What you decide to do is up to you and what you feel most comfortable with.

If the group you join is job search-related—or you are joining groups outside of your industry and you are concerned that you might inadvertently reveal the identification of your current company—you will want to hide the group icon so that it does not show up on your profile. You can easily do this in the group preferences settings once you are accepted into the group.

Become a Thought Leader Using LinkedIn

Wondering how to use the LinkedIn Activity Feed at the top of your home page? Articles you can post regarding those things that are relative to thought leadership include:

Info on a great career/leadership book you just read.

  • A picture of you with the keynote speaker at a conference or seminar you recently attended.
  • Links to one of your blog posts or an interesting career-related article you just read or were quoted in.
  • A photo of your volunteer service—running a 5K for a cause, for example -or promotion of any other cause about which you are passionate.

Once or twice a month is all you need to keep you top of mind with your network and solidify your branding and professional perception.

Bonus Tip On Privacy

We all assume some risk when we put our information online. You can adjust who sees your network and activity feeds in the LinkedIn settings section of your profile. For example, if you are concerned about your employer being able to see what you are doing on LinkedIn or knowing about your connections, simply set these to private.

There are many other ways to use LinkedIn to benefit your business, career, or consulting business. These are just a few. Find more information and step-by-step strategies here.

© 2019

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑