Tag: Executive Job Search (page 1 of 6)

Here Are the Best Cities to Find 100K+ Jobs in 2019

Here are The Best Cities to Find 100K+ Jobs in 2019The Ladders posted an interesting and informative article on the US Cities with the most $100K jobs.  Is your city on the list? Read “These are the 15 cities with the most $100K+ jobs in January” to find out.

If you want to learn more about C-level job search strategies you can check out my instant access programs in my online store.

Fastest Growing Industries in the US

A nice slide show by Motley Fool shows some fantastic growth in the US across industries including specialized freight, real estate, construction, direct selling, local services, beverage manufacturing and building products, just to name a few. See the entire list and details here:

America’s 10 Fastest-Growing Industries

And if you are ready to learn how other top executives stay in the driver’s seat during their career transitions and cherry pick the opportunities they wish to vet, then check out my Hidden Job Market Strategies for VP and C-Suite Executives.


Mary Elizabeth Bradford, CARW, MCDMary Elizabeth Bradford and her elite team of award-winning, top certified executive resume writers and former top executive recruiters and global HR executives help many of the world’s premier CxO’s and thought leaders secure the transitions and compensation packages they want. Would you like to discuss your executive level transition and explore your options? Book a complimentary, confidential discovery call now by clicking on the work with us tab at the bottom of the screen.

 

CEO Resume Samples: 3 Things to Look For in a Results-Producing CEO Resume

Is it time to dust off your CEO resume? If you are being recruited or ready to vet a new CEO position or wishing to step into your first CEO role – your executive resume is the foundation for your audiences first perception of you. You know how first perceptions are – once they are “set” it’s very hard to move the needle – so your executive resume has a tremendous amount of power to create the impression you want.

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Real Estate Unicorns + More Hot Startups

Check out these burgeoning RE tech companies and 30 HOT new startups that are growing too.

A Look at the Top 5 Fastest Growing Industries of 2018

Cybersecurity, AI, and my personal favorite, alternative energy. Some very interesting information here from World Finance on today’s fastest growing industries. Read “Top 5 of the fastest-growing industries in the world.”

The Fast Track to CEO

Here is a really interesting article I wanted to share with you outlining a successful track to the CEO seat. Some great insight here on adopting turnarounds, taking risks and stepping sideways. Check out HBR’s, The Fastest Path to the CEO Job, According to a 10-Year Study.

U.S. Job Openings at a 16-Year High

The monthly Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, or JOLTS, released by the Labor Department on Tuesday shows job openings at a record high.

Read more here!

Job Search Tips: Executive Networking at the C-Level

How to empower others to help you and WOW them with your networking savvy.

If you are a CXO, you are in a unique leadership position that makes traditional “networking” a tricky proposition. After all, you can’t really pass around your resume stating, “If you hear of anyone that is looking for a good CEO, please give them my resume.” I mean, technically you CAN, but who would WANT to take this approach?

Leaders do best when they are in control. To maintain control you must lead your networking conversations with confidence and make it easy for others to help you and to make good decisions for you. The best way to do that is by empowering them with information. Here are a few tips:

Create Your List

Create a list of networking contacts and keep adding to it. Don’t “play the end result” by assuming who can and cannot help you. None of us can determine everyone our networking contacts know or what opportunities they may be aware of.

Contact Your List and Tell Them Your Parameters

If you are vetting opportunities, here are a few things you can quickly share with your network that will be important for them to know:

  • Whether your search is out in the open or confidential
  • If you have a geographical preference
  • What titles you would consider
  • What industry or industries you would consider
  • The company size you prefer
  • Your sense of urgency

Your statement may be something like this:

“I wanted to confidentially share with you that I am selectively vetting CTO/CIO/CISO roles in 10B+ technology companies. I would prefer to stay on the East Coast.”

You can follow that up by asking for a short endorsement, sharing you would like to be considered by the company he/she works for or just stating that you are sharing this information with a select small network.

Piggybacking a Request for Endorsement

Asking for an endorsement is a great way to give your networking contact something that they can easily do for you – and it becomes a natural reason to share your parameters with them. After you state your career parameters, ask for a one or two sentence endorsement and if you can, coach them on the topic you wish for them to speak to.  When it comes to endorsements, the shorter the better – like the back of a book jacket. Why? Because they get read whereas paragraphs get skimmed!

Maybe you say:

“I wanted to ask if you wouldn’t mind indulging me with a short endorsement, perhaps something about the XYX merger and my leadership relative to M&A’s in our last two roles together?”

This way, you can collect endorsements that support whatever your goals are moving forward. If you have an ideal role that you know demands certain specific skills, you can help your endorsees by sharing with them what you would like for them to mention. This is a very powerful technique and it allows your network to feel they have done something meaningful for you. You may or may not use all of the endorsements you collect, and that is okay. The bigger goal is to be able to share your career transition goals with your network.

The Art of Not Asking for Help, Job Leads, or Interviews

The hardest part about networking is NOT asking for an interview or pushing in any way. When you ask for information and share with the goal of demonstrating you know who you are and where you are going,  it attracts creativity, help, and intrigue. It empowers those in your network to make good decisions for you. With your new approach, they will be thinking of ways they can aid you and they will do this with more energy because it is now their idea, not yours, and because you didn’t push them into a corner and obligate them to help you!

So the next time you ask for an informational interview or to take your mentor out to coffee with the sole purpose of handing them a resume before they get a chance to ask for it, STOP. Ask for advice, mentoring, information, a referral, and share your job search parameters. Do not ask for an interview, a job, or if they know of anyone who is looking and/or hiring. Yes, asking these questions does work sometimes, but not often. It is uncomfortable to be asked point blank and my clients tell me it’s awkward to ask.  I think it’s a conflict of position.

As a CXO, when you ASK for help by pushing out your resume, you give away your power. Instead, why not demonstrate your savvy, your enthusiasm for possibilities, your leadership, your confidence and your business sense and empower others with the information they need to make good decisions – for you.

Quick Tip: How to Find CXO Jobs

>> Not able to listen to the audio right now? Click here to read the transcript. <<

Job Leads April 2017

Hiring continues across the US in media, entertainment, technology, alternative energy, and transportation (to name a few).

 

A full list of companies in the news who are expanding and hiring here:

http://leads.careercloud.com/

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