Tag: job interview mistakes

Executive Job Search Tips: What to Do If No One Is Getting Back to You Post-Interview

inteview follow upHave you come out of an interview floating on a cloud, but after a week or two still haven’t heard back from the company? Don’t despair. Here are some tips to get through the interview roller coaster.

Let me begin by saying that I have never walked through a job search with a SVP or COO and NOT had the subject come up of either a recruiter or a company not getting back to them promptly. So, let’s just establish that these things happen to the most wonderful of executives. The trick is how you manage the situation and keep your composure during the emotional highs and lows associated with most job transitions.

Follow Up Begins in The Interview

The challenge in deciding appropriate level of follow-up on your part is that some employers prefer you were very aggressive in your initiative, while others may find it off-putting. The solution requires getting more information up front during your interviews. One of the last questions you should ask in a phone or in-person interview is, “Where do we go from here?”

Get a Commitment

If possible, get a commitment to a day or week time frame when they will get back to you. If that day/week passes, then simply follow up with a polite, brief e-mail. You can even follow up with a phone call. Restate your excitement about the opportunity, the date they shared with you, and that you are following up with a courtesy call. If you don’t hear back, follow up again a few days later, just don’t get defensive. Maintain your composure at all times! Keep your phone and e-mail messages short and positive.

Demonstrate Your Interest

Another legitimate reason to follow up is because you’ve heard positive news about the company. Set up an alert in Google for the company, and when a press release or article is published about it, Google will send it to your e-mail. If the information has to do with growth, an award, or any relevant subject of discussion, send it to your contact(s) with a short, positive note. This is very flattering, puts the focus on them, and shows your initiative.

Keep it Positive

You should always follow up confidently, consistently, politely, and with positive excitement. Remember, your personality is being evaluated as if every message or e-mail you leave is a post-interview. Leaving the safety of any of these virtues can backfire on you, so be careful! It is human nature to take job search “rejection” or “silence” personally—even though we all know it is not personal—and many times, it is simply due to the very benign reason that no one has followed up with you. Keep in mind that we cannot judge accurately what might be happening on the other end.

You will be much better prepared to deal with the wins and losses associated with your job search (that are an inevitable part of the process) if you come up with two or three job search strategies to secure your interviews. Do those things consistently each week, while being as objective as you can about the end game. After all, if you list a bike on Craigslist and 3,000 people see it, does that mean you are going to get 3,000 calls? You will (maybe) get a less-than-1% response. This is good to remember in a job search. Do the right things consistently—and keep your pipeline full of potential opportunities.

Job Interviews: 5 Reasons You Won’t Get Hired

smugAfter coaching hundreds of professionals over the years, it has been enlightening to see and understand the various reasons people don’t get hired.

Here are a few mistakes you can easily avoid with a little practice:

Mistake #1: Too Arrogant

There is a fine line between the confidence you need to have and being overly confident in a job interview. If you catch yourself saying any of the following statements you might be you might be skating that line:

“I am in no rush.”

“I need XXX of money.”

“I am being interviewed by ___ other companies.”

State your achievements, but stay grounded, respectful and diplomatic to ensure the best outcome. Make certain your potential employer knows you are enthusiastic about the position!

Mistake #2: Too Laid Back

I am a big believer that things end where they begin and most employers would agree that first impressions are paramount. Failing to promptly return calls and send thank you notes are easy errors to make that have disastrous implications.

Mistake #3: Still Grieving

A tumultuous split, being fired, or being laid off, are all difficult situations that usually require a grieving process to get over. Denying yourself the time it takes to heal and move on can result in your being “less than your best” in your interviews. You might not even notice it, but unfortunately, your interviewers will.

Give yourself a little time. Have some kind of “moving on” ceremony (this helps tremendously), so when it comes time to talk about your past employment, you can do so without raising any red flags.

Mistake #4: Too Money-Driven

When you put the focus on the salary you will command too early in the interview, or before you are asked about money, then you are perceived as asking for money, not wanting to add value to the company. Keep the focus on the value you bring to your potential employer and the money almost always takes care of itself.

Mistake #5: Too Vague

The best way for you to pique the interest of potential employers from the start is to take a strong sales/consultant role. Meaning specifically, you must continue to peel back the onion of their needs and then speak to those needs. They will be the key reasons for wanting to hire you, so show them you understand what their challenges are and demonstrate you have the solutions. Failing to zero in on your potential employers’ needs can cost you the job.

By understanding how we are perceived in interview situations it’s much easier to circumvent potential roadblocks to your career success and the job of your dreams. 

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